If you would like to stay in your current home when you are elderly, then you might need to make changes to it now to make it a comfortable place for an elderly person to live.

Most homes in the U.S. were not built with elderly people in mind. This is especially true for older homes.

Houses in the U.S. often have too many stairs for elderly people. Bathrooms can be too small for a person in a wheelchair to easily use. Cabinets and countertops can be too high to reach.

These are just a few examples with homes that can be a problem for elderly people, as Tulsa World reports in “Transition your home for aging in place.”

 Therefore, if you are planning to stay in your own home during your elder years or if you are a younger person moving an elderly relative in with you, then you need to make sure your home is appropriate for the elderly.

You might need to make some changes to your home.

In many places, there are experts on elder living who can assist you by coming to your home and telling you what changes you should make.

Even if you do not live in an area where that service is available, a little common sense will go a long way in helping you figure out how to adapt your home for an elderly resident.

Ideally, of course, you should adapt your home for an elderly resident before it is necessary to do so.

That will give you time to make the right changes or to find a good contractor to make the changes for you.

Reference: Tulsa World (August 22, 2017) “Transition your home for aging in place.”

If you would like to discuss setting up your Estate Plan with an experienced attorney at Simmons & Schiavo, LLP, call (781) 397-1700.